Homefront: The Revolution, The sequel that refuses to die - Games Weekly

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Friday, November 28, 2014

Homefront: The Revolution, The sequel that refuses to die

Did you forget about Homefront: The Revolution ? It’s okay to admit it, we won’t be mad. Alright, so we sort of forgot about it too… are you happy now ? We’ve been shamed publicly. Regardless, you’ve probably read the story a gazillion times by nowand it’s about as cheery as watching the grass growin Skyrim, so let’s move past this as quickly as possible. Earlier in the year Crytek briefly imploded, cancelled development of Ryse: Son Of Rome II and sold the IP rights of Homefront to Deep Silver the folks behind Saints Row and reduxing of Metro to focus on development of F2P and mobile games.

Okay, time fora deep breath, there were some seriously negative vibes in that last sentence. But it's all good now. Homefront is finally in solid hands, and there's still a chance that The Revolution could rise from the burning ashes of two publishers anew. The Revolution already survived the THQ meltdown and at this point we are honestly starting to question whether the franchise is cursed. We hope it isn't, we’re kind of fond of Deep Silver.


And you know what, we kind of loved what we’ve seen of The Revolution so far too. The now defunct Crytek UK studio was in the process of forging the ultimate guerrilla warfare simulator. While we don't know what personnel has made the leap to Deep Silver’s new Dambuster Studio
the assumption is most we can only hope the team is still pushing to realise its original vision.

And what a vision it is: America under the oppressive boot of Korean militants, streets bustling with routine beatings and background checks, the rumblings of a resistance buta whisper on the wind. The Revolution is forging a futuristic Cold War to be our sandbox cobbled together guns and RC Car IEDs are our toys. What you do with those toys is completely up to you. The overall goal is to liberate small sections of Philadelphia, rescuing captured resistance members and generally being a nuisance for the invading Koreans.

But honestly, we’re not even certain this is a war we even have the slightest possibility of winning. The Revolution is all about avoiding head on confrontations. This is guerrilla warfare. It’s about hitting the enemy when they least expect it in ways they wouldn't expect and then getting the hell out of there before they can respond in full force. Such is the life of resistance fighter.

We're actually fairly confident that under new leadership The Revolution could get better than it ever had any chance of being. You see, Crytek made some of the best looking shooters of the last generation but man, were they mundane. Be it in Far Cry or Crysis, the gunplay was always the uneventful action you had to endure in order to appreciate an otherwise spectacular showcase of a studio’s technical prowess. Perhaps the remaining Crytek UK staff will go a little crazy embrace some of their Time Splitters heritage and produce a stunning-looking shooter with a big, beautiful open world and supremely slick gunplay. Agamer’s gotta dream.

There are still a couple of aspects of The Revolution that we are yet to see properly in action, but if it comes together as planned will really help sell the overall concept. Four player co-op, streets alive with emergent NPCs raging against their new masters, safe house and base acquisition and the opportunity to build our own factions of rebel troops.

Let’s talk perfect world here: if Homefront 2 ends up being even slightly like the spiritual sequel to IO Interactive’s Freedom Fighters that we’ve always dreamed of, then we’ll be in gaming heaven. For now, we are taking comfort in the knowledge that Homefront: The Revolution has survived the fall of yet another publisher, and come out the other side intact. Don't expect the game to be shown in the wild until next year, though, as Deep Silver works to establish its newstudio and get development back on track.

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